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  • April 22, 2017 11:05 AM | CORVA Administrator (Administrator)

     News Release

    California Desert District

    For Immediate Release: April 14, 2017                                                                                 CA-CDD-17-13

    Contact: Stephen Razo, 951-697-5217, srazo@blm.gov

    BLM seeks public input on proposed route designations in San Bernardino County

    MORENO VALLEY, Calif. - The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Barstow Field Office, has scheduled two public open house meetings to gather public input on a route designation proposal affecting 148 miles of routes located on BLM public lands currently maintained by the County of San Bernardino Public Works Department. Segments of these routes are under county maintenance and are limited to street legal only vehicles, as defined by the California Department of Motor Vehicles. 

    This route designation proposal will allow the BLM to analyze and determine if the consistent management of these routes across the two jurisdictions is in the public interest. This process is temporary until a final decision on the West Mojave (WEMO) Route Network Project is issued.

    The open house meetings will allow the public an opportunity to learn how the proposed actions may affect the use of these routes, as well as the overall recreational experience on public lands. The three currently scheduled meetings will be held on:


    Wednesday, April 19, 2017 (5:30 to 6:30 p.m.)

    Yucca Valley Community Center

    (Yucca Conference Room)

    57090 Twentynine Palms Highway

    Yucca Valley, CA 92284

    Thursday, April 20, 2017 (5:30 to 6:30 p.m.)

    Barstow Field Office

    (Main Conference Room)

    2601 Barstow Rd, Barstow, CA 92311


     

    Wednesday, May 3, 2017 (5:30 to 6:30 p.m.)

    Barstow Field Office

    (Main Conference Room)

    2601 Barstow Rd, Barstow, CA 92311

     

    Representatives from the BLM will be available to answer questions regarding location of routes, and maps will be available for viewing.  Representatives will also explain the process involved in proposing the route designations and how the public can formally participate.

    This initial public review and comment period closes May 12, 2017, and written comments can be submitted at the meeting or via email to Matt Toedtli at mtoedtli@blm.gov

    This proposed action stems from the January 19, 2017 stipulation for additional interim remedies related to the 2006 WEMO litigation. In the stipulation, the BLM agreed to initiate a process to determine whether a temporary public land order should be issued for the 148 miles of routes pending a final decision in the WEMO Route Network Project.

    A list of the proposed street-legal only routes under consideration can be obtained at the Barstow Field Office or at https://www.blm.gov/office/barstow-field-office. For more information, to submit your input through other means, or if you have special needs for accommodation to participate in the open-house meetings, please contact Barstow Field Office, Planning and Environmental Coordinator Matt Toedtli at (760) 979-7564, or email mtoedtli@blm.gov.    

       --BLM—

    2835 Calle San Juan De Los Lagos, Moreno Valley, CA 92553

     

  • April 15, 2017 11:36 AM | Bruce Brazil (Administrator)

    An ongoing legislative attempt to reopen the Clear Creek Management Area has taken place.  H.R.1913 was introduced in the House by Rep. J. Panetta on April 5th.  The text of the bill can be read here:

    https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/1913/text

    It has been referred to the House Committee on Natural Resources. 

  • April 03, 2017 2:23 PM | CORVA Administrator (Administrator)

    212.1 Definitions:

    • Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV): Any motorized vehicle that drives on National Forest System Lands, including cars, trucks, motor homes, motorcycles and other vehicles. This may include street legal registration or non-highway legal registration.

    Subpart B

    212.50   Purpose, scope, and definitions

    (a) Purpose. This subpart provides for a system of National Forest System roads, National Forest System Trails and areas on National Forest System lands that are designated for motor vehicle use. After these, trails and areas are designated; motor vehicle use including class of vehicles and time of year not in accordance with these designations is prohibited by 36 CFR 261.13 will have to be reviewed by the responsible official at the District Ranger level to determine inclusion into the National Forest System road, trail and area inventory. Motor vehicle use off designated roads and trails and outside designated areas is prohibited by 36 CFR 261.13. Travel Management shall be regarded as a mandate for sustainable motorized use on National Forest System lands, rather than a mandate for closure of National Forest Service routes.

     (b) Scope. The responsible official may incorporate previous administrative decisions regarding travel management made under other authorities, including designations and prohibitions of motor vehicle use, in designating National Forest System roads, National Forest System trails, and areas on National Forest System lands for motor vehicle use under this subpart.

    (c)  For definitions of terms used in this subpart, refer to §212.1 in subpart A of this part.

    212.51 Designation of roads, trails, and areas

    (a) General. Motor Vehicle use on National Forest System roads, on National Forest System trails, and in areas on National Forest System lands already designated or under review for designation shall be designated by vehicle class and, if appropriate, by time of year by the responsible official on administrative units or Ranger Districts of the National Forest System, shall be designated provided that the following vehicles and uses are exempt from these designations:

    (1) Aircraft;

    (2) Watercraft;

    (3) Over-snow vehicles (see §212.81);

    (4) Limited administrative use by the Forest Service;

    (5) Use of any fire, military, emergency, or law enforcement vehicle for emergency purposes;

    (6) Authorized use of any combat or combat support vehicle for national defense purposes;

    (7) Law enforcement response to violations of law, including pursuit; and

    (8) Motor vehicle use that is specifically authorized under a written authorization issued under Federal law or regulations.

    (9) Parking motor vehicles shall be at a safe distance from a route of travel. Parking motor vehicles will be in accordance with 36 CFR 261.15 (h) and shall not unreasonably disturb the land, wildlife or vegetative resources.

     

    (b)  Motor vehicle use for dispersed camping, big game retrieval, fuelwood cutting and fuelwood retrieval, rockhounding, recreational mining and gathering of edible resources. In designating routes, the responsible official may include in the designation the limited use of motor vehicles within a specified distance of certain forest roads or trails where motor vehicle use is allowed, and if appropriate within specified time periods, solely for the purposes of dispersed camping or retrieval of a downed big game animal by an individual who has legally taken that animal. Solely for the purposes of dispersed camping, big game retrieval, fuelwood cutting and fuelwood retrieval, rockhounding, recreational mining, and gathering of edible resources, cross country is allowed. Cross country travel will be in accordance with 36 CFR 261.15 (h) and shall not cause damage or unreasonably disturb the land, wildlife or vegetative resources.

    In addition, consideration for the allowance of cross-country travel needs to be given special consideration for disabled and elderly access. The responsible official shall coordinate ease of access with secondary users of road and trails including private property owners, grazing permittees, owners of mining claims, as well as ensure ease of access to sacred sites and burial areas.

     

    212.52 Public Involvement

    (a) General. The public is an integral and necessary component shall be allowed to participate in the designation of National Forest System roads, National Forest System trails, and areas on National Forest System lands and revising those designations pursuant to this subpart. The responsible official shall coordinate stakeholder groups, including representation of the public who have interest as secondary users of roads, trails, and areas, as a required component of the decision-making process. Active coordination with local governments and tribes shall also be required. Decisions are required to be made with site specific field analyses. At any time If there is a disagreement regarding interpretation of State Vehicle Codes, the State’s interpretation shall prevail.

     

    Advance Notice shall be given to allow for public comment, consistent with agency procedures under the National Environmental Policy Act, on proposed agency designations, any and all route closures and revisions. Public notice with no further public involvement is sufficient if a National Forest or Ranger District has made previous administrative decisions, under other authorities and including public involvement, which restrict motor vehicle use over the entire National Forest or Ranger District to designated routes and areas, and no change is proposed to these previous decisions and designations.

    Evaluations

    (b)Absence of public involvement in temporary, emergency closures 

    (1) General. Nothing in this section shall alter or limit the authority to implement temporary, emergency closures pursuant to 36 CFR 261, subpart B, without advance public notice to provide short-term resource protection or to protect public health and safety.

    (2) Temporary, emergency closures based on a determination of considerable adverse effects. If the responsible official determines that motor vehicle use on a National Forest System road or National Forest System trail or in an area on National Forest System lands is directly causing or will directly cause considerable adverse effects on public safety or soil, vegetation, wildlife, wildlife habitat, or cultural resources associated with that road, trail, or area, the responsible official shall immediately close that road, trail, or area to motor vehicle use until the official determines that such adverse effects have been mitigated or eliminated and that measures have been implemented to prevent future recurrence. The responsible official shall provide public notice of the temporary closure pursuant to 36 CFR 261.51, including reasons for the closure and the estimated duration of the closure, as soon as practicable following the closure.

     

    212.53 Coordination with Federal, State, county, and other local governmental entities and tribal governments.

    The responsible official shall coordinate with appropriate Federal, State, county, and other local governmental entities and tribal governments when designating National Forest System roads, National Forest System trails, and areas on National Forest System lands pursuant to this subpart. The responsible official shall engage in significant coordination with state, local government, and tribes to provide a seamless transportation system that encompasses local planning designations.  National Forest System Roads, National Forest System trails and areas on National Forest System lands that are designated or under review for designation must provide seamless connectivity for the public with local government routes. 

    212.54 Revision of designations.

    Designations of National Forest System roads, National Forest System trails, and areas on National Forest System lands pursuant to §212.51 may be revised  after required engagement with public stakeholders and significant coordination with state, local government and tribes as outlined in §212.53. as needed to meet changing conditions. Revisions of designations shall be made in accordance with the requirements for public involvement in § 212.52, the requirements for coordination with governmental entities in § 212.53, and the criteria in § 212.55, and shall be reflected on a motor vehicle use map pursuant to § 212.56.

    212.55 Criteria for designation of roads, trails, and areas.

    (a) General criteria for designation of National Forest System roads, National Forest System trails, and areas on National Forest System lands. In designating National Forest System roads, National Forest System trails, and areas on National Forest System lands for motor vehicle use, the responsible official shall consider effects on National Forest System natural and cultural resources, public safety, and provision of recreational opportunities, access needs; and parity of conflicts among uses of National Forest System lands. The need for maintenance and administration of roads, trails, and areas that would arise if the uses under consideration are designated; and the availability of resources for that maintenance and administration. To ensure understanding among members of the public while engaged in any NEPA process, the Forest Service shall prepare separate maps including illustrations of routes proposed for closure, routes proposed for inclusion and any other pertinent changes in designations.

    (b) Specific criteria for designation of trails and areas. In addition to the criteria in paragraph (a) of this section, in designating National Forest System trails and areas on National Forest System lands, the responsible official shall consider mitigation measures in lieu of closing routes, and effects on the following, with the objective of minimizing:

    (1) Damage Effects to soil, watershed, vegetation, and other forest resources;

    (2) Harassment of wildlife and significant disruption of wildlife habitats; Viability of species and species habitat as considered in the whole rather than individual, with a goal of encouraging active conservation measures.

    (3) Conflicts between motor vehicle use and existing or proposed recreational uses of National Forest System lands or neighboring Federal lands; and Connectivity of routes for access needs including fuelwood cutting and retrieval, big game retrieval, rockhounding, recreational mining, gathering of edible resources, dispersed camping, needs of disabled and elderly, and access to secondary uses dependent on motor vehicle route including private property owners, holders of mining claims, grazing permittees and needed access to sacred and burial sites.

    (4) Conflicts among different classes of motor vehicle uses of National Forest System lands or neighboring Federal lands.

    In addition, the responsible official shall consider:

    (5) Compatibility of motor vehicle use with existing conditions in populated areas, taking into account sound, emissions, and other factors balanced with potential negative impact on local economies, tourism and pertinent economic factors from closures including consideration from local residents who may be disproportionally affected in a negative manner by road closures

    (6) Require Logging Systems Engineer and Fire Management Officer Evaluation for each road proposed for closure.

    (7) Require consideration of secondary uses that are non-motorized but require motorized access to the forest (i.e. dispersed camping, hunting, fishing, rockhounding, hiking, wildlife viewing, cross-country skiing, etc)

     (c) Specific criteria for designation of roads. In addition to the criteria in paragraph (a) of this section, in designating National Forest System roads, the responsible official shall consider:

    (1) Speed, volume, composition, and distribution of traffic on roads; and

    (2) Compatibility of vehicle class with road geometry and road surfacing.

    (d) Rights of access. In making designations pursuant to this subpart, the responsible official shall recognize:

    (1) Valid existing rights; and

    (2) The rights of use of National Forest System roads and National Forest System trails under §212.6(b).

    (e) Wilderness areas and primitive areas. National Forest System roads, National Forest System trails, and areas on National Forest System lands in congressionally designated wilderness areas or primitive areas shall not be designated for motor vehicle use pursuant to this section, unless, in the case of wilderness areas, motor vehicle use is authorized by the applicable enabling legislation for those areas.

    212.56 Identification of designated roads, trails, and areas.

    Designated roads, trails, and areas shall be identified on a motor vehicle use map. Motor vehicle use maps shall be made available to the public at the headquarters of corresponding administrative units and Ranger Districts of the National Forest System and, as soon as practicable, on the website of corresponding administrative units and Ranger Districts. The motor vehicle use maps shall specify the classes of vehicles and, if appropriate, the times of year for which use is designated. The motor vehicle use map should be of the quality that can be used as a standalone ma. It has to be clearly legible and designed to be used in conjunction with other available maps. This map is not to be used as the sole proof and/or determination of legal motor vehicle travel on National Forest Service lands.

     

    212.57 Monitoring of effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas.

    For each administrative unit of the National Forest System, the responsible official shall monitor the effects of motor vehicle use on designated roads and trails and in designated areas under the jurisdiction of that responsible official, consistent with the applicable land management plan, as appropriate and feasible.

     

    Subpart C Over-Snow Vehicle Use

    § 212.80 Purpose, scope, and definitions.

    (a) Purpose. This subpart provides for a system of National Forest System roads, National Forest System trails, and areas on National Forest System lands that are designated for over-snow vehicle use. After these roads, trails, and areas are designated, over-snow vehicle use not in accordance with these designations is prohibited by 36 CFR 261.14. Over-snow vehicle use off designated roads and trails and outside designated areas is prohibited by 36 CFR 261.14.

    (b) Scope. The Responsible Official may incorporate previous administrative decisions regarding over-snow vehicle use made under other authorities in designating National Forest System roads, National Forest System trails, and areas on National Forest System lands for over-snow vehicle use under this subpart.

    (c) Definitions. For definitions of terms used in this subpart, refer to § 212.1.

    212.81 Over-Snow Vehicle Use

    (a) General. Over-snow vehicle use on National Forest System roads, on National Forest System trails, and in areas on National Forest System lands shall be designated by the Responsible Official on administrative units or Ranger Districts, or parts of administrative units or Ranger Districts, of the National Forest System where snowfall is adequate for that use to occur, although no minimum snow depth shall be defined and, if appropriate, shall be designated by class of vehicle and time of year, provided that t The following uses are exempted from these decisions:

    (1) Limited administrative use by the Forest Service;

    (2) Use of any fire, military, emergency, or law enforcement vehicle for emergency purposes;

    (3) Authorized use of any combat or combat support vehicle for national defense purposes;

    (4) Law enforcement response to violations of law, including pursuit; and

    (5) Over-snow vehicle use that is specifically authorized under a written authorization issued under Federal law or regulations.

    (b) Previous over-snow vehicle decisions. Public notice with no further public involvement is sufficient if an administrative unit or a Ranger District has made previous administrative decisions, under other authorities and including public involvement, which restrict over-snow vehicle use to designated routes and areas over the entire administrative unit or Ranger District, or parts of the administrative unit or Ranger District, where snowfall is adequate for OSV use to occur, and no change is proposed to these previous decisions. All existing Forest Service System roads and trails shall be designated for OSV use, unless specifically prohibited following NEPA analysis.

    (c) Identification of roads, trails, and areas for over-snow vehicle use. Designation of National Forest System roads, National Forest System trails, and areas on National Forest System lands for over-snow vehicle use shall be reflected on an over-snow vehicle use map. Over-snow vehicle use maps shall be made available to the public at headquarters of corresponding administrative units and Ranger Districts of the National Forest System and, as soon as practicable, on the Web site of the corresponding administrative units and Ranger Districts. Over-snow vehicle use maps shall specify the classes of vehicles and the time of year for which use is designated, if applicable.

    (d) Decision-making process. Except as modified in paragraph (b) of this section, the requirements governing designation of National Forest System roads, National Forest System trails, and areas on National Forest System lands in § 212.52 (public involvement), § 212.53 (coordination), § 212.54 (revision), § 212.55 (designation criteria (including minimization)), and  § 212.57 (monitoring), shall apply to decisions made under this subpart. In making decisions under this subpart, the Responsible Official shall recognize the provisions concerning rights of access in sections 811(b) and 1110(a) of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ( 16 U.S.C.3121(b) and 3170(a), respectively).

    Subpart A

    212.5 Road System Management

    (a) Traffic rules. Rules set forth under 36 CFR part 261 and this section shall apply to all National Forest System roads under the jurisdiction of the Forest Service except when in conflict with written agreement.

    (1) General. Traffic on roads is subject to State traffic laws where applicable except when in conflict with designations established under subpart B of this part or with the rules at 36 CFR part 261. If there is disagreement in interpretation of State law, the State’s interpretation shall prevail.

    (2) Specific. The following specific traffic rules shall apply unless different rules are established in 36 CFR part 261.

    (i) The load, weight, length, height, and width limitations of vehicles shall be in accordance with the laws of the States wherein the road is located. Greater or lesser limits may be imposed and these greater or lesser limits shall be established as provided in 36 CFR part 261.

    (ii) Roads, or segments thereof, may be restricted to use by certain classes of vehicles or types of traffic as provided in 36 CFR part 261. Classes of vehicles may include but are not limited to distinguishable groupings such as passenger cars, buses, trucks, motorcycles, all-terrain vehicles, 4-wheel drive vehicles, off-highway vehicles, and trailers. Types of traffic may include but are not limited to groupings such as commercial hauling, recreation, and administrative.

    (iii) Roads, or segments thereof, may be closed to all vehicle use as provided in 36 CFR part 261.

    (iv)  Additional rules may be imposed as provided in 36 CFR part 261.

    (b) Road System

    (1)Identification of road system :  For each national forest, national grassland, experimental forest, and any other units of the National Forest System ( § 212.1), the responsible official must identify the minimum road system needed for safe and efficient travel for public use, and for administration, utilization, and protection of National Forest System lands. In determining the minimum road system, the responsible official must incorporate a science-based roads analysis at the appropriate scale and, to the degree practicable, involve a broad spectrum of interested and affected citizens, other state and federal agencies, and tribal governments. The minimum system is the road system determined to be needed to meet shall support resource and other management objectives adopted in the relevant land and resource management plan ( 36 CFR part 219), to meet applicable statutory and regulatory requirements, to reflect long term funding expectations, to ensure that the identified system minimizes mitigates adverse environmental impacts associated with road construction, reconstruction, decommissioning, and maintenance.

    (2) Identification of unneeded roads. Responsible officials must review the road system on each National Forest and Grassland and identify the roads on lands under Forest Service jurisdiction that are no longer needed to meet public use, forest resource management objectives and that, therefore, should be decommissioned or considered for other uses, such as for trails. Decommissioning roads involves restoring roads to a more natural state. Activities used to decommission a road include, but are not limited to, the following: reestablishing former drainage patterns, stabilizing slopes, restoring vegetation, blocking the entrance to the road, installing water bars, removing culverts, reestablishing drainage-ways, removing unstable fills, pulling back road shoulders, scattering slash on the roadbed, completely eliminating the roadbed by restoring natural contours and slopes, or other methods designed to meet the specific conditions associated with the unneeded road. Forest officials should give priority to decommissioning those unneeded roads that pose the greatest risk to public safety or to environmental degradation.

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • March 28, 2017 4:27 PM | CORVA Administrator (Administrator)

    The advent of the new administration in Washington, D.C. provides an opportunity to undo some of the regulatory overreaching of past administrations.  One excellent candidate is the 2005 regulation issued by the United States Forest Service (the “Forest Service” or the “Service”) that has resulted in the unnecessary closure of tens of thousands of routes and trails to off-road motorized travel in the nation’s national forests.  Those closures were made by the Forest Service in connection with dozens of Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) under the National Environmental Policy Act (”NEPA”), by which the Service unintelligently sought to restrict public access to our national forests.  

    We believe NEPA was enacted by Congress to protect the “human environment,” not to keep humans out of the environment.  The 2005 regulation was worded in a way that encouraged the Forest Service to use NEPA to restrict, rather than allow public access to public lands.   With targeted language changes, Travel Management Rule regulations can be made to encourage rather than discourage public access.

    The First Amendment of the United States Constitution provides citizens with the right to petition the government for redress of grievances, which the Supreme Court has characterized as “among the most precious of liberties safeguarded by the Bill of Rights.”  That provision, along with statutory authority in the Administrative Procedure Act, 5 U.S.C. Section 553(e), gives us the right to file with the Forest Service an Administrative Petition seeking revision of the 2005 rule, while at the same time seeking rescission of the numerous EISs and Records of Decision made under that rule.  Rather than attacking each EIS and Record of Decision individually, which would take substantial time, effort, and resources, we could address in the Administrative Petition the source of the problem, namely, the 2005 Rule.  This could be accomplished without litigation or legislation.

    For decades advocacy groups such as the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Environmental Defense Fund have effectively used the Administrative Petition process to persuade federal agencies to take stringent regulatory measures restricting access and use of public and private lands.  Once a federal agency sets rules in place, courts tend to defer to its “expertise,” making it difficult to succeed in challenging final agency rules in court.  

    Now it’s our turn to use the same administrative process to roll back the regulatory wave, using a healthy dose of liberty-thinking.  There is no better place to wage this battle than in the arena of public access to our national forests under the new administration.  

    We have been talking with Ted Hadzi-Antich, a lawyer who is with the Texas Public Policy Foundation (“TPPF”), an Austin-based, liberty-oriented, non-profit organization.  TPPF’s website is http://www.texaspolicy.com.  Ted has expressed an interest in working with us in connection with the administrative petition process.  As a non-profit group, TPPF would not charge legal fees if it undertakes the legal representation. We have concentrated our efforts on the following areas for change:

    ·       Access to the public for: Fuelwood cutting and fuelwood retrieval, dispersed camping, big game retrieval, rockhounding, recreational mining and gathering of edible resources.

    ·       Coordinate ease of access with secondary users of road and trails including private property owners, grazing permittees, owners of mining claims, and ensure ease of access to sacred sites and burial areas.

    ·       Require Forest Service officials to engage in significant coordination with state, local government, and tribes for a resulting transportation system that encompasses local planning designations. 

    ·       Require the responsible official to consider effects on natural and cultural resources, public safety, and provision of recreational opportunities, access needs for elderly and disabled to ensure parity of experience for motorized and non-motorized users.

    We are seeking like-minded off-road organizations in all parts of the nation to join our efforts. We look forward to hearing from you! If you are interested, please contact:

    Corky Lazzarino

    Executive Director

    Sierra Access Coalition

    O: (530) 283-2028

    C: (530) 616-0133

    info@sierraaccess.com

    Amy Granat

    Managing Director

    California Off-Road Vehicle Association

    O: (916) 775-4744

    C: (916) 710-1950

    info@sierraaccess.com


  • March 08, 2017 11:08 AM | Bruce Brazil (Administrator)

    The OHMVR Division has posted the preliminary grant requests and is asking for public comments.  Keep the comments professional and only related to the contents of the grant request. 

    For instructions on how to read and comment on any of the grants, start here:

    http://olga.ohv.parks.ca.gov/egrams_ohmvr/admin/ViewAppDocs.aspx?pdfappcode=000825 

    If you only want to read submitted comments, click here:

    http://ohv.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=29501

  • March 03, 2017 5:39 PM | AJ Granat (Administrator)

    Find Your Legislator and send a polite letter to your representatives restating some of the following in your own words:  

    • I am a constituent and would like you to oppose SB 249 (Allen). 
    • This legislation would have an extremely harmful effect on the California Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Program.
    • The California OHMVR Program is a national model that provides high quality environmentally sustainable recreational opportunities for millions of motorized recreation enthusiasts. 
    • The program is based on the user-pay, user-benefit philosophy. Taxes collected on fuel used in off-highway vehicles are dedicated to the program to benefit those who pay the taxes. 
    • SB 249 would result in the diversion of these funds for non-OHV related purposes. SB 249 also would weaken OHV representation on the California OHV Commission and severely limit opportunities for public involvement in the decision-making process. 
    • There is nothing remotely equitable about these provisions. The California Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Program is vitally important to me and millions of California citizens who enjoy off-highway vehicle recreation.
    • California businesses depend on a healthy OHV recreation program with adequate funding as OHV recreation contributes billions of dollars to California’s state and local economies and plays an important role in the quality of life of its citizens. 
    • We urge you to oppose SB 249.



  • March 03, 2017 10:39 AM | AJ Granat (Administrator)

    There are currently nine different OHV-related bills that have been submitted to our California legislature in 2017.  All of the bills will have to go through various committees and be approved.  Minor to major changes to the bill is to be expected during the process.  The two bills that would affect the state OHV program which runs under the Off Road Motorized Vehicle Recreation Division (OHMVR) of the California Department of Parks and Recreation will be the first to be reviewed.  Bills that affect the financing of the state OHV program will be reviewed in a later article.

    Assembly Bill 1077: This bill will eliminate the sunset date on CA’s OHV program.  Our state OHV program started in 1971, through the enactment of the Chappie-Z’berg Off-Highway motor Vehicle Law.  In 1982, the principals of the law were expanded upon enactment of the Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Act.  Numerous amendments to the act have been enacted.  The current legislation regulating the OHV program, SB742, was passed nine years ago with a sunset (expiration) date of Jan. 1, 2018.  If no legislation is passed this year to change the expiration date, our state OHV program will no longer exist.  The future of our SVRA’s would be in question.  AB 1077 is a simple bill that if passed, would eliminate the sunset date completely.  Amendments to the OHV program could still be made each legislative year.  

    AB 1077 Legislative Info

    Senate Bill 249:  This bill makes major changes to the state OHV program.

    1.  The bill would require the Director of Parks and Recreation to assemble a science advisory team to advise and assist the department and the division in meeting the natural and cultural resource conservation purposes of the act, as specified.  The bill would also prohibit any expansion of an existing or development of any new, state vehicular recreation area or allocation of grant program funds for new or expanded units of the system until the science advisory team completes its review and submits its recommendations to the department, and the department implements the recommendations.

    2.  Existing law requires any money temporarily transferred from the Off-Highway Vehicle Trust Fund to the General Fund to be reimbursed, without interest, within 2 fiscal years of the transfer.  This bill would delete this provision 

    3.  Currently a major portion of the funding for the OHV program comes from the Motor Vehicle Fuel Account and that money is deposited in the Off-Highway Vehicle Trust Fund.  SB-249 would change this:

    This bill would initially require these fuel taxes to be transferred to the State Parks and Recreation Fund. The bill would require the Director of the Department of Parks and Recreation, in consultation with the State Park and Recreation Commission, to include, in the annual budget submitted by the Governor to the Legislature, a proposed allocation of fuel taxes for the purposes of the department, including support for state parks and the Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Program. The bill, upon enactment of the Budget Act, would require the portion of fuel tax revenues allocated by the Budget Act for purposes of the Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Program to be transferred to the Off-Highway Vehicle Trust Fund. The bill would make statements of legislative intent in this regard.

    4.  The OHMVR Commission is made up of 9 political appointees.  Under current legislation, there is flexibility in the makeup of the Commission members.  Under SB-249, tighter adherence to the diverse representation would be required.  No more than two Commissioners may serve under the same qualification at the same time.

    The qualifications are:

    (1) Off-highway vehicle recreation. 

    2) Biological or soil sciences.

    (3) The legal and practical aspects of rural landownership and management.

    (4) Law enforcement.

    (5) Environmental and cultural resource protection.

    (6) Nonmotorized outdoors recreation.

    5.  This bill would extend the sunset date for five years to Jan. 1, 2023, by which time the legislature would have to pass a bill to once again extend the time frame of the OHV Program.

    SB 249 Legislative Info



  • February 16, 2017 9:13 AM | CORVA Administrator (Administrator)

    HELP PLAN HUNGRY VALLEY SVRA!

    Please stop by to provide your input!

    Public Workshops will be held at the following locations:
    1 Ventura County
    Feb. 15, 2017, 6 - 8 p.m.
    Topping Room, E.P. Foster Library
    651 E. Main Street, Ventura, CA 93001

    2 Los Angeles County
    Feb. 16, 2017, 6 - 8 p.m.
    William S Hart Museum Meeting Hall
    24151 Newhall Avenue, Newhall, CA 91321

    3 Frazier Park
    Feb. 22, 2017, 6 - 8 p.m.
    Cafeteria, Frazier Mountain High School
    700 Falcon Way, Lebec, CA 93243

    4 Kern County
    Feb. 22/23, 2017, 6 - 8 p.m.
    Clarion Hotel
    3540 Rosedale Highway, Bakersfield, CA 93308

    Project Contact: Peter Jones
    Off-Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation Division
    San Andreas District
    Email: info@PlanHungryValley.com
    Mail: P.O. Box 1360
    Lebec, California 93243


    Download the PDF

  • January 28, 2017 2:14 PM | CORVA Administrator (Administrator)

    Urge President Donald Trump to oppose the Office of United States Trade Representative's proposal to place 100 percent tariffs on motorcycles imported from the European Union in the E.U. - U.S. beef hormone trade dispute. The tariff would affect motorcycles with an engine size between 51cc and 500cc, which includes a vast range of off-road machines and many entry level street bikes and scooters.

    CORVA and other OHV advocates, oppose the proposed tariff, because we believe trade disputes residing within the boundaries of the agricultural industry should not be solved with trade sanctions levied against non-agricultural products. Further, the impact of this tariff increase will have a cascading effect through the motorcycle industry, consumers and those linked to either the consumers or the industry. 

    Affected manufacturers include: 1) Aprilla; 2) Beta; 3) BMW; 4) Ducati; 5) Fantic; 6) Gas Gas; 7) Husqvarna; 9) KTM; 10) Montesa; 11) Piaggio; 12) Scorpa; 13) Sherco; 14) TM; and 15) Vespa.

  • January 03, 2017 10:46 AM | Bruce Brazil (Administrator)

    On Jan 12, 2017, there is a meeting scheduled by the California Coastal Commission concerning potential changes to the permit for Oceano Dunes SVRA.

    To read the documents related to the meeting:

    https://documents.coastal.ca.gov/reports/2017/1/th14a-1-2017.pdf

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